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QC

 

A Unique Whimsy 

By Philip Szporer “Ôs” Krea Movo, Lucie Carmen Grégoire

Lucie Carmen Grégoire is finding her voice. This fresh choreographer, who is establishing herself within the ranks of Montreal’s dance community, recently presented the local premiere of her latest work, “Ôs”.  

 

How do you critique a dying man’s art? 

By Philip Szporer “Over My Dead Body” Dave St-Pierre

Dave St-Pierre is dying. It’s not a secret. Over the last many years, he’s been up-front about it in interviews and on stage.

 
Undercurrents | Courant Continu

Hélène Langevin

By Megan Andrews

Hélène Langevin est directrice artistique de Bouge de là, une compagnie québécoise qui crée des spectacles multidisciplinaires pour le jeune public.

 

Character, comedy, video, wigs … oh, and some dancing 

By Philip Szporer “Dulcinea’s Lament”, “Çaturn” Dulcinea Langfelder & Co., Naomi Stikeman

Dulcinea Langfelder loves to tell stories, and she loves to make people laugh. She does both in spades in her new fusion of theatre, movement, song and multimedia, “Dulcinea’s Lament”.

 

Two plus Four 

By Philip Szporer Patterson and Ward with Trosztmer and Juteau at Studio 303 & Murugesan and Wadge at the Festival Transatlantique Montréal   Peter Trosztmer, Audrée Juteau, Thea Patterson, Katie Ward, Festival Transatlantique Montréal, Meena Murugesan, Chanti Wadge  

A combo of two intriguing solo works, presented at the Festival Transatlantique Montréal, jumpstarted the new season.

 

In and Out of Frame 

By Philip Szporer “Enfin vous zestes” Louise Bédard

Creativity is shaped in different ways, and inspiration leads to sometimes unexpected results.  

 

Remix, Mash-Up, Smash-Up, etc. 

By Philip Szporer, Marie Claire Forté Festival TransAmériques 2008  Festival TransAmériques

Philip Szporer and Marie Claire Forté in conversation throughout the Festival TransAmériques 2008. 

 

A Portrait: the artist in his forties 

By Philip Szporer “Quarantaine 4x4” Charmaine LeBlanc

“Quarantaine 4x4” is that happy experience in the theatre where you leave feeling full, uplifted.  

 

Indigenous Dancelands 

By Melanie Florence “The Threshing Floor” Kaha:wi Dance Theatre

On the night of the worst snowstorm of the year in Montréal, I trekked through the sleet and wind to a small dance space called Tangente to see the touring performance of Indigenous Dancelands, a program of three works by aboriginal Canadians: Gaétan Gingras performing “Mémoire de sang”; Michelle Olson and Kimberly Tuson (Raven Spirit Dance) in “Songs of Shär Cho”; and Santee Smith and Michael Greyeyes (Kaha:wi Dance Theatre) in “The Threshing Floor”.

 

Choreographer returns to "adult" work 

By Philip Szporer “Suites cruelles” Hélène Blackburn, Cas Public

Cue Nancy Sinatra’s hit tune, “These Boots Are Made for Walking”, and cue the fun. If you don’t remember it, the sixties song kicks, and to hear it bang out of the speakers at a contemporary dance performance is cheeky.  

 

Creative Convergence 

By Philip Szporer “Lifelines” Gioconda Barbuto, Emily Molnar, Michael Slobodian

Expectations were high. Gioconda Barbuto and Emily Molnar are both celebrated dancers and have the kinds of credentials most artists dream about.  

 

An Intuitive Connection 

By Philip Szporer “Confort à retardement” John Ottman, France Geoffroy, Corpuscule Danse

“Confort à retardement” is John Ottman’s choreography created for France Geoffroy, a dancer and choreographer gaining recognition in Canada and abroad. The fact that Geoffroy is paraplegic defines the production, produced by her company Corpuscule Danse.  

 

New Hybrid Equations 

By Lys Stevens “Sit back ya’ll”, “pi.r.squared”, “Text Messaging…” Julia Gutsik, Raul Guevara, 4EverFresh, Rebecca Halls, Arcus Intorchao Hula Hoop Duo, Patricia Iraola

Génération bigarrée: a new title for a favourite series within Tangente’s programming. What does this new name suggest? Formerly Danses urbaines (an ambiguous title that became politicized as some artists resisted the fit), this series highlights artists working with high-energy movement forms referencing youth culture.  

 

A Missed Opportunity 

By Philip Szporer “Décompte” Zab Maboungou, Compagnie Danse Nyata Nyata

It’s not surprising to report that Zab Maboungou, the Congo-raised Montréal-based dancer-choreographer and philosopher, has devotees who speak about the transformative effects of her dance.  

 

A Certain Selection of Dance 

By Philip Szporer, Marie Claire Forté Festival TransAmériques  Festival TransAmériques 

This May marked the inaugural program of the Montréal-based dance and theatre event, Festival TransAmériques. To cover the dance programming at this year’s premiere event, The Dance Current invited writers Marie Claire Forté (Ottawa) and Philip Szporer (Montréal) to exchange their views in an e-mail conversation. Here are their evocative and emphatic impressions.  

 

Dance As a Metre of the Times 

By Philip Szporer "Amjad" Édouard Lock

Édouard Lock’s new revisionist ballet, Amjad, has a way of messing with our heads. Those who mistakenly expect that Lock’s current choreography draws on the signature barrel turns and the sexual ambiguity of his work in the 1980s will be sorely disappointed. And for those interested to see how he has continued his exploration of the classics of the ballet repertoire, there will be expectation. 

 

Reconnections 

By Philip Szporer A mixed progam by Gaétan Gingras  Gaétan Gingras

Iroquois-Mohawk by ancestry, but cut off from his roots for most of his life, at fourteen Gaétan Gingras learned that his maternal grandparents were aboriginal. The truth had been hidden for many years.  

 

Keeping It Real at 48 

By Michèle Moss Mixed program by Louise Lecavalier  Louise Lecavalier

Seeing Louise Lecavalier dance is a trip of sorts: a fairground ride through time and space, a wonderland tour across a history of body politics and the ideals of nationalism, the excess of the 1980s, the exuberance of the 1990s.  

 

An Unwieldy Opus 

By Philip Szporer “Bas-reliefs” Marie-Josée Chartier

It all began from a fascination with pioneering visual artist Betty Goodwin’s “Swimmers” series from the 1980s. From this source, in which Goodwin drew, using graphite, charcoal and oil pastels, on a kind of translucent paper, dancer-choreographer Marie-Josée Chartier conceived a multi-disciplinary mega-production, “Bas reliefs: un dyptique”.  

 

Doubles territoires 2/Split Stage 2 

By Philip Szporer New works by Peter Trosztmer and Ségolène Marchand  Peter Trosztmer, Ségolène Marchand

The performance began outside the theatre. Conceptual pieces of printed, bent metal stuck on wooden planks were suspended along the corridor walls leading to the theatre. Inside, bent bicycles in tormented shapes hung from the walls and ceiling.  

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