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Contributor

Kaija Pepper

Contributor

Kaija Pepper writes for several publications, including The Globe and Mail. The Man Next Door Dances: The Art of Peter Bingham, her third dance history book, was a finalist for the 2008 City of Vancouver Book Award. She enjoys teaching writing at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts. | Kaija Pepper [rédactrice invitée, rédactrice adjointe des critiques] écrit pour plusieurs publications, y compris The Globe and Mail. The Man Next Door Dances: The Art of Peter Bingham, son troisième livre d’histoire de danse, a été finaliste pour le prix du livre 2008 de la Ville de Vancouver. Elle aime bien enseigner la rédaction à la School for the Contemporary Arts de l’Université Simon Fraser. 

Kaija Pepper's Work

 

A Ceremonial Event  

By Kaija Pepper “Percy Gladstone Memorial Dance (The Skidegate Project)” Karen Jamieson Dance Company, Dancing on the Edge Festival

The good news from the Edge is that it got off to a great start. Margie Gillis, the opening headliner for the 17th annual Dancing on the Edge Festival of Contemporary Dance, drew excellent houses for both nights of her “Voyages Into the Interior Landscape”. Gillis appeared at the mid-sized, close to 700-seat Vancouver Playhouse, an upscale, downtown theatre, and to see it well filled and bustling made for a festive launch to the ten-day event. 

A Stage Full of Hurtin’ Albert’ns  

By Kaija Pepper “Nine Points to Navigate” Brian Webb Dance Company

What is the soul of a man? … When Sheri Somerville and Brian Webb ask the question in “Nine Points to Navigate”… the answer is more meaningfully grounded in their particular world, growing up in post-World-War-II Alberta.  

 

Gods and Dance Know Space and Time  

By Kaija Pepper "Vivarta -- Manifestations of Vishnu" and "HowZaat!" Lata Pada, Sampradaya Dance Creations

For her latest project, choreographer Lata Pada travelled to India to hold auditions. The artistic director of Toronto-based Sampradaya Dance Creations was in search of full-time professional bharata natyam dancers, a rare breed in Canada.  

 

First, A Comedy 

By Kaija Pepper RIFF Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg, Day Helesic

Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg is half man. On her father’s side, going way back. Also, she tells us at the start of “BANGER”, she married a man. Amazing, eh? Who better, then, to explore the contemporary male than Friedenberg?  

 

Vancouver International Dance Festival 2005

By Kaija Pepper Vancouver International Dance Festival Vancouver International Dance Festival

The fifth Vancouver International Dance Festival at the Roundhouse Community Centre took place from March 8-26, 2005 

 

The Birthday Edition 

By Kaija Pepper Twelve Minutes Max XXX  Twelve Minutes Max

Twelve Minutes Max has had a long haul as a dance series goes. The inaugural 12 MM took place in December 1994 but its roots go back a few years further. Anne Cooper remembers the mixed bill’s precursor, an informal community event held at Main Dance Place in the Arcadian Hall at Main Street and 6th Avenue. It was called Shoeless Saturday because everyone had to take their shoes off before entering the studio. In the early nineties, Cooper danced in one of those shows and, during a telephone conversation, told me she always meant to do another. But it was only now that she had the right project at the right time. 

Taking Turns Telling Tales 

By Kaija Pepper Double Story Crystal Pite, Richard Siegal

“Double Story” is just that – two stories. The first is “The Bouncy Woman Piece” by Richard Siegal, an American; the second, “Man Asunder” by Vancouver’s Crystal Pite. Both highly theatrical duets, performed by Siegal and Pite, feature dancing that is meticulously inscribed in space with long limbs and precise intention. 

Thinking/Moving

By Kaija Pepper

I Seem to be a Verb by Susan Elliott: Vancouver: April 27-May 1, 2004

Social Studies

Bringing it back: The Reason for Remounts By Kaija Pepper

 

Paper, Fire and a Dying Swan 

By Kaija Pepper "A Fabulous Disaster" Denise Clarke

For most of “A Fabulous Disaster”, Denise Clarke wears a white paper jumpsuit, with a white hood covering her head. Her costume puffs out around her, making her look bigger than she really is. Clarke’s body language, too, is bigger, more expansive.

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