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Contributor

Helen Simard

Editorial Advisory Committee, Contributor

Helen Simard is a Montréal-based choreographer, rehearsal director, and dance researcher. After working with Solid State Breakdance for twelve years, an artist collective that combined street and contemporary dance, she switched gears in 2012 to lead her own artistic projects. Her current choreographic research explores the codes and aesthetics of rock music, creating lively, interactive, performances that challenge the conventions of stage dance forms: her most recent work, REQUIEM POP, premiered at Agora de la danse in April 2019. She is currently writing her first play, when your baby dies. Helen holds a BFA (2000) and MA (2014) in contemporary dance.

Helen Simard's Work

 

Repetition is a Form of Change

Andrea Peña’s Untitled I + III By Helen Simard

In her latest work, choreographer Andrea Peña uses “sameness,” or repetition, as a catalyst for change, highlighting the transformative nature of the body as it oscillates between a site of resilience and vulnerability.

Organic Mechanics

By Helen Simard

Emmanuelle Lê Phan and Elon Höglund have a contagious, fast-paced energy and have always approached their art with a fierce passion. As co-founders of Tentacle Tribe, the Montréal-based pair have had a long creative partnership. They talk candidly about their work together and what’s next.

 

In the Cypher

Three street-to-stage performances in Montréal By Helen Simard

2019 might be the year that the Montréal stage dance community finally catches on to what’s going on in our city’s street dance scene.

Dancing in Domestic Spaces

By Helen Simard

Traditional black box theatres allow audiences and performers anonymity from each other. How does domestic performance put these relationships at the forefront of the work?

Movers

Complex Textures By Helen Simard

Complex Textures: Simon Renaud

Moving Forward, Looking Back

By Carol Anderson, Kate Stashko, Helen Simard

A special three-part feature on dance in Canada

Andrew Tay in Make Banana Cry by Tay and Stephen Thompson / Photo by Claudia Chan Tak
 

Slippery Identities

By Helen Simard Make Banana Cry

In their new work, Make Banana Cry, Andrew Tay and Stephen Thompson tease and out the tensions between identities and stereotypes in the layers and performance of Asian-ness in western society.

In the Shadows

By Helen Simard

They work under many titles, but rehearsal directors and dance dramaturges provide essential support to the creative, technical and administrative work of choreographers and dance artists. Four practitioners who have worked in this position discuss how they understand their role and what they bring to the creative process.

 

Moving Bodies

How does the centrality of bodily experience affect interdisciplinarity in dance? By Helen Simard

It is perhaps the presence of the body – and a desire to express one’s self through and from the body – that continues to define dance as an art form.

 

Moving Beyond the Pas-de-Deux

Four Montréal-based dance artists discuss gender in contemporary dance By Helen Simard

Helen Simard discusses issues of gender in contemporary dance with four Montréal-based dance artists.

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