logo

Writers & Readers

Photo by Nathan Dumlao, courtesy of Unsplash
 
Writers & Readers

Confined by the Calendar

By Samyuktha Punthambekar

Even in “normal” circumstances, IBPOCs follow a largely Eurocentric calendar that primarily recognizes Eurocentric festivals and holidays. Because of how this calendar dictates time off, making the time to travel and train can be nearly impossible for dance artists who can only train in their home countries.

 
Writers & Readers

Why I Left Toronto

By Samyuktha Punthambekar

Punthambekar describes her experiences in Toronto dance communities and why she decided to leave.

 
Writers & Readers

Adding Colour to Dance Health

By Dr. Blessyl Buan

Dr. Blessyl Buan created the BIPOC Dance Health Directory in order to address the lack of representation she saw in dance health.

 
Writers & Readers

What Lies Ahead?

By Patricia Allison

Facing so much of the unknown, artists give their predictions for 2021

 
Writers & Readers

Jamaican

By Peter Chin

The entire poem from the Winter 2021 issue

 
Writers & Readers

apparition

By Kendra Guidolin

Poetry by Kendra Guidolin. Find more of her work in our November/December 2020 issue.

Photo courtesy of Pettet
 
Writers & Readers

Finding Home Again

By Emily Pettet

Years of traumatic rhetoric around body image and perfection have dulled the pure joy of dancing that I felt in my creative movement classes as a kid. An invisible screen of anxiety has prevented me from making it into a studio consistently. While I’ve had the desire to go, getting there has been the problem, and I haven’t been able to fix it.

 
Writers & Readers

Remembering Anna Wyman

By Emma FitzGerald

Emma Fitzgerald reflects on the life of her former dance teacher, the legendary choreographer and artistic director, Anna Wyman.

Dan Wild / Photo by Jeremy Mimnagh
 
Writers & Readers

Remembering Dan Wild

Friends and colleagues shared with The Dance Current memories of Wild.

 
Writers & Readers

Welcome to Our World

By Patricia Allison

Can digital innovation during COVID-19 be leveraged in a post-pandemic world to make dance careers more accessible?

Chowdhury and Yip / Photo by Amy Wong
 
Writers & Readers

Dancing Before Walking

By Sima Chowdhury

Sima Chowdhury speaks about her journey to recovery through dance.

A figure in a white tutu dances in a blur
 
Writers & Readers

This Shape

By Kendra Guidolin

Kendra Guidolin shares a short fiction piece on the subject of body image.

Barbara Diabo's Community Project: Life is Good Thanks / photo by Tamara Romanchuk
 
Writers & Readers

(Re)Connecting the Circle

By Amy Hull

Claudia Moore’s MOonhORsE Dance Theatre presented Older & Reckless #42 in November of 2019. Amy Hull responds to the six works presented by artists Bill Coleman, Barbara Kaneratonni Diabo, Christine Friday, Elizabeth Langley, JP Longboat, Byron Chief Moon, and Lee Maracle.

Writers & Readers

Message for International Dance Day From Louise Lecavalier

Louise Lecavalier shares a message for International Dance Day, via Regroupement québécois de la danse.

 
Writers & Readers

All Things West

By Sky Fairchild-Waller

In The Right Eye of Clint, I see an architect – someone who muses over how designed space and humans converge.

 
Writers & Readers

Ecologies of Care

By Andrea Frolic

If you listen to Peggy Baker describe her work move, she’ll tell you the piece is about the experience of giving and receiving care, of being tended to and tending to others.

 
Writers & Readers

Textiles and Truth-Telling

By Kristin Harris Walsh

The word ori is a Yoruba word meaning head and representing one’s life path, purpose, destiny and spiritual intuition. While Afro-Brazilian spiritual beliefs may seem miles away both physically and culturally from St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, the recent production, titled Ori, brought the two together.

 
Writers & Readers

Lights, Curtain, Music

By Anaïs Loewen-Young

For Robert McQueen, one of the most important aspects of a musical is its use of composition; the role of music can make or break a production. “The music isn’t just providing a nice melody,” he states.

 
Writers & Readers

Who Tells and Cries Our Freedom?

By Collette Murray

A student-choreographed routine included dancers wearing slave and master outfits and an attempted tribal dance in dashikis and coloured “Afro” wigs to disco movements. This was April 2018, and the performance held in Barrie, Ontario, sparked a controversial social media reaction on cultural ethics.

 
Writers & Readers

Canadian Dancers Across the Pond

By Rachel Levitt

Fresh out of high school, two friends from “Cowtown” (Calgary, Alberta) upped sticks and made a bold move across the pond to London, England.

Go to page:

CURRENT ISSUE

LISTINGS THIS WEEK