logo

Toronto

 

The Rite and Harmony of “White” 

By Penelope Ford “White” Xing Dance Theatre of Canada

The beauty of the technique of classical dance is born in the ritualistic process of endowing the body with dance, in the hope that it will enchant the soul.  

 

"From the Horse's Mouth" 

By Michael Crabb The Premiere Dance Theatre 25 years on  Tina Croll, Jamie Cunningham

Harbourfront Centre celebrated the 25th anniversary of the Premiere Dance Theatre with the first Canadian production of From the Horse’s Mouth, an adaptable, transportable, live performance documentary program concept, devised a decade ago by New York-based dance artists Tina Croll and Jamie Cunningham.

Disjunctures? 

By Terrill Maguire between here and now KemiCollective, Jennifer Dallas

“It is sometimes in the aftermath of our crossed paths that we discover what a shared experience really is.” – Marc Boivin  

 

When Dance Fell to Grace: a trio of solos (unsolicitied) 

By Penelope Ford Falling to Grace HOWDARESHE productions

Tanya Crowder describes the austere beauty of Venus in repose: supple neck climbing out of extended collarbones, braced by curving shoulders, yet her vulnerability is plain in her crooked knees that dip apart and ankles that wilt towards the floor.  

 

Routes and Roots 

By Penelope Ford CanAsian International Dance Festival  CanAsian International Dance Festival

In its tenth year, the CanAsian International Dance Festival does more than recognize the multiculturalism of Canadian dance; it reveres the place of tradition in dance.

 

Ensnared in Memory 

By Aubrey Reeves Adelheid Solos Heidi Strauss

Heidi Strauss’s Adelheid Solos is a program of two pieces that demonstrates the dancer/choreographer’s impressive versatility, stamina and strength as a dancer.  

 

A Troubling Beauty 

By Megan Andrews, Kaija Pepper Abattoir Kaeja d'Dance

A cross-country conversation between Kaija Pepper and Megan Andrews about the premiere of Karen and Allen Kaeja’s Abattoir. 

 

Silence / Light 

By Penelope Ford Portal Peggy Baker Dance Projects

It seems the momentum of Peggy Baker’s thirty-five-year dance career is still gathering speed.  

 

Peter Chin: ethno-choreographer  

By Megan Andrews “Transmission of the Invisible” Peter Chin, Tribal Crackling Wind

The inimitable Peter Chin is known for his multi-disciplinary work and particularly for his interest in Asian cultures and dance forms. The Jamaican-born, Toronto-based choreographer’s latest work, “Transmission of the Invisible”, carries this interest forward.  

 

Edges of Darkness 

By Kaija Pepper, Megan Andrews “Manga” Serge Bennathan

What would it be like to inhabit the world of manga, the Japanese cartoon art form that fills its pages with forceful depictions of energy and stillness in characters whose emotions tend toward epic proportions? “Manga”, Serge Bennathan’s full-length duet, goes some way to answering that question through transforming those one-dimensional, black and white drawings into real-world – although admittedly highly abstract – modern dance.

 

Enunciating History and the Present 

By Samantha Mehra “Kaksori” Mi Young Kim Dance Company

The paradoxical ability of dance to transcend language and yet tell stories stirs the imagination. This fascinating quality was ever-present in “Kaksori”, Mi Young Kim Dance Company’s first full-evening program at Harbourfront’s Premiere Dance Theatre.  

 

An Ambitious Anniversary Ballet 

By Bridget Cauthery “Anastasia” Bengt Jörgen, Ballet Jörgen Canada

Jörgen’s “Anastasia” is a fictional dramatization of episodes from the life of Anastasia Romanov, the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last tsar of Russia.  

 

A Scavenger Hunt for Dance 

By Samantha Mehra Nuit Blanche  Nuit Blanche 

The countdown has officially begun for Nuit Blanche, Toronto’s all-night contemporary art celebration beginning tonight (September 29th).  

 

Immaculate Perception [a response] 

By Carol Anderson "Necessary Velocity" Michelle Silagy

Questions rose, watching “Necessary Velocity”. Questions came from the work itself, and from the act of observation – questions related to details of looking and the ethics of response.  

 

One Old, One Borrowed, One New 

By Emma Doran “Light | Confronts | Unknown” Dancemakers

Michael Trent must feel eyes focussed in his direction. “Light Confronts Unknown” is his first major program for Dancemakers after being appointed artistic director in August 2006.  

 

Layering Tradition and Identity 

By Kathleen Smith “Meeting with Saghi” Sashar Zarif

In Persian culture, the character of Saghi is a beloved wine-bearer who embodies ideals and beliefs of the tradition that created him in much the same way as the stories of Krishna inform the East Indian cultural landscape. 

 

Bringing the Outside In 

By Gregory C. Beatty “the Weathering Suite” Davida Monk, M-Body

Choreographed by Davida Monk for her Calgary-based dance company M-Body, “the Weathering Suite” arrived in Regina at a curious moment. The UN was in the process of releasing a long-awaited report on climate change; Al Gore and Inuit environmentalist Sheila Watt-Cloutier had just been nominated for the Nobel Peace prize; and in Canada, the environment, and climate change in particular, had become the hot-button political issue.  

 

Seeking Common Rhythmic Ground 

By Samantha Mehra “Tappin’ at the Winch: The Resurgence” Paula Skimin, Turn on the Tap

In this city of diverse traditions, the promise of experiencing several cultural art forms in one performance tempts the cosmopolitan appetite. For those with such a taste, Turn on the Tap’s “Tappin’ at the Winch: The Resurgence”, at the Winchester Street Theatre, offered a range of flavours.  

 

A Whirl of Sound and Motion 

By Kathleen Smith “Asala” Arabesque Dance Company

One of Toronto’s most successful dance companies is devoted to forms of dance that have entranced devotees and audiences alike for thousands of years. Under the direction of Yasmina Ramzy, the Arabesque Dance Company takes Middle Eastern dance vocabularies and showcases them, for the most part respectfully, and to the delight of their fans.  

 

A review in the shape of a conversation 

By Kathleen Smith, Megan Andrews “/dance/songs/” Ame Henderson, public recordings

“A dance in the shape of a rock show.” Sounds like a good idea, right? It was only a matter of time before someone figured out how to harness the casual collectivity and emotional energy of going to hear a favourite band and applied it to a choreographic concept.  

CURRENT ISSUE

LISTINGS THIS WEEK